Introduction
Victims
Suspects
Witnesses
Ripper Letters
Police Officials
Official Documents
Press Reports
Victorian London
Message Boards
Ripper Media
Authors
Dissertations
Timelines
Games & Diversions
Photo Archive
Ripper Wiki
Casebook Examiner
Ripper Podcast
About the Casebook


Most Recent Posts:
Hutchinson, George: A closer look at George Hutchinson - by Fisherman 43 minutes ago.
Hutchinson, George: A closer look at George Hutchinson - by Fisherman 52 minutes ago.
Scene of the Crimes: Location of lamps etc - by JeffHamm 1 hour ago.
General Discussion: The Seaside Home: Could Schwartz or Lawende Have Put the Ripper's Neck in a Noose? - by Simon Wood 1 hour ago.
Scene of the Crimes: Location of lamps etc - by drstrange169 6 hours ago.
General Discussion: Frederick Gehringer: Barrow Lender, Lodging House Keeper and Crime Lord? - by seanr 8 hours ago.
Elizabeth Stride: Elizabeth's murder and the double event - by Lewis C 8 hours ago.
Elizabeth Stride: The Schwartz/BS Man situation - My opinion only - by Mark J D 14 hours ago.

Most Popular Threads:
Elizabeth Stride: The Schwartz/BS Man situation - My opinion only - (12 posts)
Suspects: A closer look at Leon Goldstein - (9 posts)
Hutchinson, George: A closer look at George Hutchinson - (8 posts)
Scene of the Crimes: Location of lamps etc - (7 posts)
Pub Talk: Useless Thread... - (3 posts)
Elizabeth Stride: Elizabeth's murder and the double event - (2 posts)


Pall Mall Gazette
12 December 1888

JACK THE RIPPER'S MOTIVE
To the Editor of the Pall Mall Gazette

Sir,
Although the anxiety to solve the Whitechapel mystery is, for the nonce, allayed, if not extinct, it may interest students of human nature to hear of a somewhat similar case in which the murderer, when discovered, was found to be actuated by a less extraordinary motive that that of solving necromantic problems, attributed to the Whitechapel monster by the writer of "Who is the Whitechapel Demon?", published in your issue of the 6th. inst. Forty or fifty years ago, my grandfather, a Portuguese judge at Coviltra, convicted a man for the murder of sixteen women by stabbing them in the abdomen. For the space of twelve months the inhabitants of the town had been in a state of wild panic at the periodical repetition of such hideous and objectless crimes, as in no case could pillage or lust be ascribed as the cause; the victims, in many cases, being penniless octogenarians. At last the miscreant was caught in flagrante delicto, and on trying him for wilful murder Judge Joao de Campes received from him the confession that he had done it solely to enjoy the fun of watching the grimaces the poor women made in their agony! I have no details of the criminal's modus operandi, as it occurred long before my time; I had in fact forgotten this episode in my grandfather's judicial career until the accounts of the London ghastly tragedies brought to my mind the conviction that should the East end murderer ever be brought to justice, which I do not anticipate, it will be ascertained that his motive has been either a morbid taste of the very same kind, or an exaggerated longing for notoriety, coupled with the love of excitement that feeds on perusing the different versions of his deeds, his intentions, and the means he employs to defeat the combined intellects of the detective administrations of London, which last feat, be it said, might make anybody a little proud.

Yours faithfully
Esther Delaforce
9 Courthope villa, Wimbledon
December 8.