Introduction
Victims
Suspects
Witnesses
Ripper Letters
Police Officials
Official Documents
Press Reports
Victorian London
Message Boards
Ripper Media
Authors
Dissertations
Timelines
Games & Diversions
Photo Archive
Ripper Wiki
Casebook Examiner
Ripper Podcast
About the Casebook

 Search:


Most Recent Posts:
Kosminski, Aaron: Is Kosminski still the best suspect we have? - by Wickerman 25 minutes ago.
Kosminski, Aaron: Is Kosminski still the best suspect we have? - by Herlock Sholmes 1 hour ago.
Kosminski, Aaron: Is Kosminski still the best suspect we have? - by Herlock Sholmes 1 hour ago.
Kosminski, Aaron: Is Kosminski still the best suspect we have? - by Herlock Sholmes 1 hour ago.
Lechmere/Cross, Charles: All roads lead to Lechmere. - by The Baron 1 hour ago.
Kosminski, Aaron: Is Kosminski still the best suspect we have? - by The Baron 1 hour ago.
Kosminski, Aaron: Is Kosminski still the best suspect we have? - by Wickerman 1 hour ago.
Kosminski, Aaron: Is Kosminski still the best suspect we have? - by The Baron 1 hour ago.

Most Popular Threads:
Kosminski, Aaron: Is Kosminski still the best suspect we have? - (58 posts)
Lechmere/Cross, Charles: All roads lead to Lechmere. - (31 posts)
Maybrick, James: One Incontrovertible, Unequivocal, Undeniable Fact Which Refutes the Diary - (23 posts)
Lechmere/Cross, Charles: Evidence of innocence - (12 posts)
Pub Talk: Republican about-face on vaccinations - (4 posts)
Ripper Authors: New Book: REWRITING WHITECHAPEL's LEGACY: An exercise in Behavioural Science. - (2 posts)


Evening Standard (London)
25 September 1888

Dr. Phillips, who made the post-mortem examination of the body of Annie Chapman, the victim of the last Whitechapel murder, has been sent to Durham in reference to the terrible crime committed in the district. Dr. Phillips left London last evening. Inspector Roots, of the Criminal Investigation Department, also left London last evening for Durham, with the object of ascertaining whether any of the facts connected with the murder on Saturday night are likely to elucidate the Whitechapel murders. Up till a late hour last evening local police had obtained no clue to the murderer. The whole neighbourhood had been scoured and the people have everywhere shown the greatest zeal to assist the police in the search, but their efforts have been, so far, without reward. The methods of the murderer so closely resemble those of the Whitechapel cases, that the local authorities are strongly inclined to connect the two crimes.


WORSHIP-STREET

Catherine Donovan, 22, a hawker of flowers, living in common lodging-houses in Spitalfields, was charged with having been concerned with another woman not in custody in hocussing and robbing John Dines, a labourer. - The Prosecutor said that he got into the neighbourhood of Spitalfields on Saturday night, and about six o'clock was in Great Pearl-street, when the Prisoner and another woman stopped him. One held him whilst the other (the Prisoner) put her hand into his pocket and took out his silver watch, valued at 2/. She ran off, and the other woman followed her. He (Prosecutor) was unable to pursue, for he fell down half-senseless and was of opinion that the women did something to him. The Prisoner put her hand over his face before robbing him, and he felt his senses going, though he knew he was being robbed. He had not spoken to either woman, and was not drunk at the time. - The Magistrate asked if he thought the woman had chloroform in her hand. - The Prosecutor said he did not know; he seemed to lose his senses as she put her hand over his face. - Police-constable Caunter, H Division, said the Prosecutor gave him information of the robbery, and about 8.30 he arrested the Prisoner. She made no denial when told the charge. The Prosecutor identified her at the Police-station from among several other women. When the charge was entered and read to her she made no reply. The other woman had not been apprehended. - Mr. Montagu Williams remanded the Prisoner.