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The City Press (London)
Wednesday, 14 November 1888

It is with great regret that I read in yesterday's Times the suggestion the Rev. Prebendary Rogers makes in regard to the unfortunate women who on account of the recent murders have been engaging so much public attention. The rector of Bishopsgate says, "All these women who ply the meretricious trade should be registered, and if need be licensed! I know the cry that will be raised against this, but I ask, are the interests of society to be sacrificed to a blatant prudery? Secondly, there should be a house to house visitation (if necessary) by the police - police dressed as the 'new police' were when they were first introduced by Sir Robert Peel, in the dress of civilians - men set apart for the work, going in and out among the people and mingling with them."