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Atlanta Constitution
Georgia, U.S.A.
23 November 1888

WHY ENGLISH DETECTIVES FAIL

If the Whitechapel Murderer was an Irish Politician He Would be Caught.

Kansas City, Mo. November 22. - (Special)
H.L. Reeves, a detective of Scotland Yard, is in this city. Speaking of the Whitechapel murder, he said it is a little surpising that the force of detectives so skilled as those of Scotland Yard have not succeeded in capturing the murderer. The failure is no doubt due to the methods used in discovering criminals. In New York Inspector Byrnes has every professional law breaker "tabled," that is, he knows who and where he is. When a crime has been committed he is able to point to the probable guilty party. This system is entirely lacking in the London force, and the detectives have to cover the entire criminal field in the search. If it were a conspiracy the English detectives would be in clover. In the case of political conspiracy, for instance, they would become members themselves, and find a member who would peach on his fellows for money, for it has been the boast of England that when she wanted an Irish crime or political offender punished she would always do it by having an Irishman to become an informer. But when it is a case of one cool, calculating fellow, of whose secret nobody is possessed, England and her detectives are at sea.