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Times (London)
5 February 1892

OBITUARY.

We much regret to announce the death in his 33d year of Mr. JAMES KENNETH STEPHEN, M.A., the younger son of Sir James Fitzjames Stephen. Mr. Stephen was educated at Eton and at King's College, Cambridge, where he obtained the Members' Prize in 1880 and the Whewell Scholarship in 1881, and, after taking his degree with a first class in the Historical Tripos and a second in the Law Tripos, he was elected a Fellow of his college. For a short time he was tutor to his Royal Highness the late Prince Albert Victor during his residence at Cambridge. Few men have left behind them, at school or college, a greater reputation for brilliant ability than Mr. Stephen, whose sayings and writings used to be quoted at Cambridge and at Eton with keen appreciation. After coming to London he started the Reflector, a weekly newspaper, and during its brief existence he himself wrote most of its articles-clever, original, and wayward compositions, which unluckily failed to command a sufficient audience. More recently he published two little volumes of poems, chiefly humorous, under the titles of "Lapsus calami" and "Quo, Musa, tendis?" and each of these met with considerable success. For some time before his death Mr. Stephen had been in ill-health, but until quite recently it was thought that he would recover.